Soul Proprietor – How to deal with an inbox vampire

by Theresa Reed on December 19, 2016

soul proprietor

It starts out innocently enough. Maybe a question about your work or some other such thing. You gladly oblige because you’re nice like that. But then…you’re inundated with a stream of emails from the same person. They have more questions and need your advice again.  In fact, they seem to need your input often. Sometimes weekly, other times daily.

They begin to become a major time and energy suck – but you feel guilty cutting them off because you don’t want to be “mean.”  Yet you feel a sense of dread every time you see their emails in your inbox.

You’ve just met the inbox vampire.

A person who clogs up your inbox with constant requests but never seems to purchase a service from you.  A freebie seeker who uses manipulation, guilt, or clever tactics to get you to give them what they want: an open portal to your work.

Here’s how it shows up in my world: I receive an email that starts out something like this: “I wonder if you’d do me a favor and toss a couple of cards” or “look at this reading I did and give me your interpretation.” There is never offer for payment and almost 100% of the time it’s around the same question “will he come back.”

I learned the hard way that engaging with these types only leads to more of the same. Letting them in the door is like inviting a vampire into your home.

In the movies, that leads to getting your neck bit. In the inbox world, it leads to a nonstop barrage of further questions or requests for “advice.”

Frankly, it chaps my hide when these types try to push their way in.  Doesn’t matter if they use tears, charm, or phony confusion tactics. I don’t like being “glamoured” or manipulated into doing free work by a stranger.  (My friends, family and good clients would never do something like this. They respect my time and my work.)

Most mystical entrepreneurs are nice. They want to serve and they have oodles of compassion.  Which means: they are perfect fodder for these types.

The ones who show up wanting a sample, a “quick question” or free taste.They have zero regard for professional boundaries. Do one “favor” and the next thing you know, it becomes a habit. Sooner or later, you’re getting peppered with constant follow up questions because they are sooooo confused and you’re soooo nice.

And worse yet, if you try to close that door – they turn on you and get nasty.

How on earth can you avoid this – or end this?

Don’t invite them in.

Here’s how:

You can ignore the email completely.  That method may feel a bit rude but it works like a charm.

If you feel that you can’t do that, then create a scripted email that politely says something like this:

Hey there!

Many thanks for writing. I will send a personal response to your email as quickly as I possibly can (cause I do appreciate you, believe me).

BUT… please take a few seconds to scan the Frequently Asked Questions & Answers that I’ve pasted right down below. Chances are? I’ve answered your question right there. And if that’s the case? Please consider this automatic note your official response.

{Put your FAQs here}

If you’re writing to me for a free reading, free business advice, free interpretations of a reading you did, or a chance to “pick my brain”,  that’s not free.  I’m a business owner and I need to charge for my services.

If you want to purchase a session with me, that’s great!  Go right here to my site and purchase the service you want:  {Your site here}

Sincerely,

{Your name}

This email usually sends the vampire straight out of my inbox.  (And probably out searching for a peer that will engage with them.)

In rare cases, they might get angry and try to send back a guilt trip or something nasty.

Hit delete.  Your delete button is your wooden stake.  Use it when things get icky.

So there ya go – simple strategies and no garlic smell!

Blessings,

Theresa

© Theresa Reed | The Tarot Lady 2016

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